Grasses and Sedges

A grass, pictured below, is a graminoid with a  circular stem and open leaf sheath. The one pictured below was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

A sedge, like the Gray’s sedge (Carex grayii) pictured below, have triangular stems and the blades have a sheath that encircles the stem. This one in particular was found near Atwood Lake, Tuscarawas County, OH.

Invasive Plants

The Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata) pictured below was found at the Norma Johnson Center in Tuscarawas County, OH. Native to Asia, this invasive plant is now know to displace plants that are native to North America.It can be used as a method for erosion control, but has escaped cultivation (Peterson’s “Trees and Shrubs” guide).

The Common Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) pictured below was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH. This invasive plant is native to Europe and like E. umbellata, it crowds and displaces plants native to North America. It is likely that it was introduced accidentally.

Monocots and (Eu)dicots

Dicots or eudicots have flower parts in 4’s or 5’s. The Common cinquefoil (Potentilla simplex) pictured below has it’s flower parts in 5’s and the leaves are broad and have net-like veins. This plant was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

Monocots have flower parts in 3’s, which can be observed in the Star-of-Bethlehem (Ornithogalum umbellatum) pictured below. The leaves of monocots are more linear and have parallel-veined leaves. This plant was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

Plant-animal Interactions

Hear is an example of plant-animal interactions at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH. It seems as if a squirrel or other mammal took the seeds!

Below, a Red Squirrel is enjoying a cone from this conifer, located in Schoenbrunn picnic area & trails in Tuscarawas County, OH. It is likely eating it’s seeds which will be dispersed in the near future.

Mosses

The Atrichum angustatum pictured below was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH on the roots of a mature tree. It has a star shape and somewhat wavy leaves.

The moss below appears to be similar to Dicranum fulvum as it is hair-like and was found on  a rock in the mature forest in The Wilderness Center, Stark County, OH.

Ferns

Dryopteris intermedia can be twice or three times compound and can have a lace-like appearance. This was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

Polystichum acrostichoides is once-compound and serrated leaflets. This was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

Threats to Trees

This tree has been subjected to some sort of fungus. From a distance it looked like some sort of bee hive. Getting closer, it engulfed the tree almost all the way around. To address this issue, surrounding trees should be monitored and research should be looked at to eliminate its presence. This was found at The Wilderness Center in Stark County, OH.

If you look closely at one of the leaves of this Red Maple (Acer rubrum), you can see an insect attached to the leaf. There is also a brown spot at the end of the insect. To address this, it would be beneficial to search for what kind of insect this is and what treatment can be used to eliminate it if it is harmful. This was found in Tuscarawas County, OH.

Shrubbery

Hawthorns (Crataegus) are widespread and individual species can be difficult to differentiate. The thorns can be used as an identification marker alongside its leaves. Hawthorns are a preferred nesting site by a variety of songbirds (Peterson’s “Trees and Shrubs” Field Guide).

Common Privet (Ligstrum vulgare) leaves are firm, elliptic, and hairless. The flowers are small and white and appear in cone-shaped clusters. A variety of song and game birds feed on the fruit (Peterson’s “Trees and Shrubs” Field Guide).