Flower Analysis

Flower 1

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, along wooded walking trail

It is on page 144 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Early Winter Cress Scientific name: Barbarea verna

Corolla: number of petals 4 separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 4 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 6 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate, 4 long and 2 short

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous? (and # of carpels) unicarpellate, 1 carpel present
How can you tell? I could only distinguish one carpel, no partitions or fusions were visible. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: Distinguishable from Common Winter Cress (Barbarea vulgaris) as this specific plant had many lobes of its basal leaves and the upper leaves were pinnately lobed. (Newcomb’s “Wildflower Guide”)

Flower 2

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, meadow/field

It is on page 246 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Yellow Wood Sorrel Scientific name: Oxalis stricta

Corolla: number of petals 5 separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 10 separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  fused

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, about 5 carpels
How can you tell? The carpel appeared to have compartments down toward the ovary but it was difficult to count them. The tip of the pistil also appeared to have multiple stigma tips. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)?  Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This plant had leaflets in 3’s with a faintly notched tip. Each flower was about 1/2″ wide. 

Flower 3

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, open field

It is on page 242 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Bulbous Buttercup Scientific name: Ranunculus bulbosus

Corolla: number of petals 5 separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens about 12  separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels) apocarpous, about 5 carpels
How can you tell? There are multiple pistils present, which appear to be separate instead of fused.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This flower was distinguishable from other Buttercups (Ranunculus) as the sepals were bent down towards the stalk of the flower. 

Flower 4

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, along wooded walking trail

It is on page 138 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Dame’s Rocket or Dame’s Violet Scientific name: Hesperis matronalis

Corolla: number of petals separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 4 separate or fused?  separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 6 separate, fused or arranged in any special way?  separate, inside the flower tube

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, 2 carpels
How can you tell? The flower appeared to have 2 carpel units fused together.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: The flowers of this plant were large and eye-catching. This flower was in abundance and appeared in purple (above), light pink, and white. 

Flower 5

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): The Wilderness Center, moist uneven-aged forest along a hiking trail

It is on page 102 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Blue-eyed Mary Scientific name: Collinsia verna

Corolla: number of petals 4-5 separate or fused? fused

Calyx: number of sepals 5 separate or fused? fused

Adroecium: number of stamens 4 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? fused

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, 4-5 carpels 
How can you tell? It seemed that there were some fused chambers present within the pistil. It was tiny and hard to distinguish but it is estimate that there are 4-5 fused carpels. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Possibly perigynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: Two white petals and two, possibly three, blue petals. 

Flower 6

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, edge of forest

It is on page 256 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common Myrtle or Periwinkle  Scientific name: Vinca minor

Corolla: number of petals 5 separate or fused? fused

Calyx: number of sepals 5 separate or fused? fused

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, 2 carpels
How can you tell? It looked like there were 2 carpel units fused together. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: The leaves were dark green and shiny.

Flower 7

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails, bordering a meadow and pond

It is on page 334 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common Star of Bethlehem Scientific name: Ornithogalum umbellatum

Corolla: number of petals 6 separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 6 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 6 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? appear separate; arranged around the pistil and looked like a crown. 

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, 6 carpels
How can you tell? There appeared to be 6 carpel units fused together. 

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: These flowers open only in sunshine (Newcomb’s Wildlfower Guide)

Flower 8

This flower was found here (location and habitat/environment): Schoenbrunn Village picnic area & trails and the Wilderness Center, along wooded trails

It is on page 56 in Newcomb’s Wildflowers.

Common name: Cream Violet Scientific name: Viola striata

Corolla: number of petals 5 separate or fused? separate

Calyx: number of sepals 5 separate or fused? separate

Adroecium: number of stamens 5 separate, fused or arranged in any special way? separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous (and # of carpels) syncarpous, 3 carpels
How can you tell? It appears that there are 3 carpel units fused together.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) or zygomorphic (irregular)? Zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: Heart-shaped leaves and creamy white flowers with purple stripes.